Photos From An Irish Trip

I’ve been really negligent about posting on this blog.  Laziness is my only excuse.  I’d like to get back to posting photos here on a more regular basis.

So the first few photographs are from a trip to Ireland in summer 2016.  It had its ups and downs.  A fuller account can be read at my main blog Quirk.

I enjoyed the short trip, although my wife felt it was not exotic enough, since most everyone spoke English!

I have more photos than this of course, but this is a start after a long pause.  All shot with Fuji X100s.

carriage-in-dublin
Carriage in Dublin
etching-glass-at-waterford
Etching Waterford Crystal
castle-blarney
Blarney Castle

Photos From Greece II

Here are a few more photos from our recent Greece trip….

The first is of the Parthenon, in all its ruined splendor.

The next is from a museum in Corinth, where I snapped a tour member trying to dodge out of the frame.

And the third is of an olive oil tasting we attended.  The idea was to dip small pieces of bread to taste all of the different versions of olive oil.  As you can see there were a lot.  There was also wine-tasting, which went along well.

(Click on any photo to enlarge.)

Parthenon
Parthenon
Museum Lurking
Museum Lurking
Olive Oil Tasting
Olive Oil Tasting

Photos From Greece I

My wife and I recently traveled to Greece.

We took a lot of photos, and I’m slowly going through mine.

Here are the first three I’ve chosen.

For some commentary on the trip, there’s a post at my other site, Quirk, titled The Dust of Greece On My Shoes.

(The Meteora photo was taken by my little Olympus XZ-1, the other two by the Fujifilm X100s.  The X100s is just a 35mm equivalent lens, no zoom — the XZ-1 has a little bit of zoom.)

Click on any photo to enlarge.

Up to the Acropolis
Up to the Acropolis
Meteora Monastery
Meteora Monastery
Santorini Church Bell
Santorini Church Bell

Impressions of Paris

My wife and I recently returned from a trip to France, mostly Paris, for a few days and from there left for Greece for the bulk of our vacation.

I’ve got a lot of photographic material now to work on.

Here are a few shots from Paris, to start.

[Click on any photo to enlarge….]

Paris Fine Dining
Paris Fine Dining
Paris Cafe
Paris Cafe
Eiffel Tower at Night
Eiffel Tower at Night

At the Othello Tunnels, Coquihalla River

As noted in last post, my wife and I took a Sunday to go look at the old Othello railroad tunnels in a provincial park near Hope, BC.

It’s hard to take a photo in a tunnel!  But there were some opportunities, and we also took photos of the rocky river itself.

[Click on any photo to enlarge….]

Othello Tunnels
Othello Tunnels “Gallery”
Tunnel Silhouettes
Tunnel Silhouettes
Coquihalla River from a Bridge
Coquihalla River from a Bridge

Walking Near Othello Tunnels

There’s a slightly hidden provincial park just outside of Hope, BC (yes we like to joke about “beyond Hope”) that has an interesting set of old railway tunnels, called the Othello Tunnels.

I say slightly hidden, because on a sunny summer Sunday afternoon, one can still find parking, and a relatively uncrowded access area at the tunnels in Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park.  The location is not very well-marked or signed, but the knowledgeable manage to find a way there.

In the early 1900s a railroad was built linking the Kootenays in the eastern half of the province with the coast over and through three mountain ranges.  The park highlights the Kettle Valley Railroad and the five tunnels cut through the high and rocky Coquihalla canyon at the western end, in a feat of bold engineering.

The tracks are long gone, and the railway grade is now a trail.  Next time the photos will be about the tunnels, but these three here are interesting textures and shapes that struck my eye near the tunnels.

[Click any photo to enlarge….]

Path Through the Woods
Path Through the Woods
Roots
Roots
Tunnel Rock
Tunnel Rock

Pitt Polder and Lake — Infrared Experiments with Fujifilm X100s

Last weekend we took a drive to the Pitt Polder and Pitt Lake area northeast of Vancouver, BC.

At the south end of the lake there is the Pitt Polder Ecological Reserve, which has a variety of trails and opportunities to rent canoes and launch boats.

Pitt Lake, although so far away from the coast, is surprisingly a tidal fresh water lake, the largest in North America, connected to the distant influential sea by the Pitt River and then the Fraser River.  The Pitt Polder area on the south includes a series of marshlands preserved in reaction to rapid disappearance in other areas in the Fraser Valley.  The first immigrants into the area were Dutch who built a series of dikes (hence “polder”) to reclaim land for agriculture.

On this day of sun and cloud, I took along my Fujifilm X100s for the outing.  I wanted to try shooting infrared style using a Hoya R72 filter.  I had one for my old Panasonic FZ50 camera, which I used to make infrared photos some years ago (see Experimenting with Infrared Photography).

The only thing is, that 55mm filter doesn’t fit on the X100s….  But with innovative use of painter’s tape to barely secure the edge of the filter in place on the short barrel of the X100s lens protector, I still managed to take shots through it.

The X100s doesn’t seem to be nearly as sensitive to the effect as the FZ50 was.  Every camera is different, and on many digital cameras the internal filtering doesn’t allow a good effect to shine through.

But in this case it often gave a special feel to the shots, akin to a pin-hole camera sometimes. That effect was increased by some low shots from my little Gorrillapod tripod.  I liked some of them, although pretty noisy — that just lends to the charm for me.

Pitt Polder Clouds
Pitt Polder Clouds
Pitt Polder Wetlands
Pitt Polder Wetlands
Pitt Lake
Pitt Lake